C&MA: A Brief History

The Christian and Missionary Alliance began as a deeper life and missionary movement initiated by Dr. Albert B. Simpson in 1887 to mobilize the underutilized lay forces and resources of the churches to "take the whole Bible to the whole world." He believed that a life completely yielded to Christ was one in which service to Christ would be of paramount importance. A person controlled by the Holy Spirit has no choice but to be involved in bringing the Good News to others, either as an overseas missionary or as a missionary at home.

The founder was reluctant to establish churches, preferring to call together Christians with a vision to evangelize the world but who remained in their local churches. However, the Christ-centered emphasis in teaching and the priority on missions made many people unwelcome in their denominations, causing them to form groups that for years were called "branches," not churches. By the mid-1970s, it became clear that The Alliance was a denomination in all but name, so with revised bylaws and constitution that reality was formalized in 1974.

Our history is rich in ministry. The cornerstone of our National Office building in Colorado Springs is a visual reminder of our roots. It was first laid at the Gospel Tabernacle in New York City in 1889.

Source: Christian & Missionary Alliance

Hmong New Hope Alliance

In 1948, the Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA) sent the Reverend Ted Andrianoff to Xieng Khouang, Laos. It wasn't until the spring of 1950 that he was able to lead the first group of Hmong people to know Christ. Through perseverance and by the grace of God, that first group of Hmong Christian believers grew to around twenty thousand in 1975.

After the Vietnam War, tens of thousands Hmong emigrated out of Laos to Thailand. Many immigrated for settlement in the United States, France and French Guyana, Australia, Canada, Argentina, West Germany and other countries.

In early 1984, a few Hmong Christian families moved to the Atlanta area from Fort Smith, Arkansas. Some of our early leaders were Rev. La Su Yang and Rev. Wang Chou Yang (then an elder), Rev. Nchye Neng Xiong (then an elder), Cha Chang Xiong, Tong Jer Thao, Chang Yer Xiong and Wang Toua Yang. This congregation began growing as more Hmong people moved to the area. In late 1984, the group was officially recognized as a fully accredited church of the Christian and Missionary Alliance. The name, Hmong New Hope Alliance Church (HNHAC), which is the church that came from Fort Smith, Arkansas, was chosen to represent us and the newfound hope we found in Christ Jesus. Most of the members came together to form the core group and started our church in the Stone Mountain-Decatur areas.

As our members increased, HNHAC was allowed to use the main sanctuary at Avondale Church for Sunday afternoon services. Five years later, in the summer of 1989, HNHAC purchased a church property on South Hairston Road in Stone Mountain, Georgia. However, once again as membership increased, HNAC required a larger church for worshipping.

As our members increased, HNHAC was allowed to use the main sanctuary at Avondale Alliance Church for Sunday services in the afternoon. In the summer of 1989, HNHAC purchased and dedicated a church property on South Hairston Road in Stone Mountain, Georgia. However, once again as membership increased, HNHAC required a larger facility.

In the life of our church, the following pastors have served with our church. We would like to thank them and their families for their dedications and services.

Kx. Laj Xwm Yaaj

Service Date: 1984-1986

Xf. Tswv Koob Yaaj

Service Date: 1987-1988

Kx. Vaam Txus Yaaj

Service Date: 1988-1993

Kx. Num Tuam Vaaj

Service Date: 1993-2002

Kx. Vam Lis Muas

Service Date: 2001-2007

Kx. Vaam Tub Hawj

Service Date: 2006-Present

Xf. Tsaav Stuvy Yaaj

Service Date: 2010-2014

Xf. Txoos Foom Yaj

Service Date: 2014-Present

Xf. Tsaav Fwj Xyooj

Service Date: 2016-Present